Terraform Vol.II…..rising from the ashes of Australia’s bushfires

Josh Dykgraaf is a master of image manipulation and all things Photoshop.  His creative work features manipulation of his own photography.

Karrak. A portrait photo of red-tailed black cockatoo.

Josh’s latest body of work, Terraform Vol. II features some work centred around the recent catastrophic Australian bushfires; limited edition art prints of Koalas, titled ‘Koobor’ and a smouldering Cockatoo, titled ‘Karrak’.  ‘Koobor’ is a photographic manipulation of landscapes in the Snowy Mountain National Park after the bushfires that occurred there in December 2019 – January 2020, while ‘Karrak’ is a photographic manipulation of leaves found in the same Victorian National Park in the December 2019 bushfires.  Josh brought the leaves back to his studio and shot them from various angles before individually placing them to form the image that you see here.

Terraform Vol. II is currently on show at the East Hotel in Manuka, Canberra until 11t5h March and proceeds from the sale of the bushfire themed work is being donated to Wires Wildlife Rescue, Australia.

Koobor

“I’ve been working on this series Terraform for a bit over a year now, transforming my landscape photography into animal forms. In November I was near Coffs Harbour visiting friends the week the fires threaten almost every town in the area and my friends almost lost their home. Then when the headlines around the widespread tragedy affecting our native wildlife started coming in, I felt like I couldn’t not make some bushfire work given what I was already doing. So, my partner and I travelled out to East Gippsland in December where we knew a string of fires had ended the week before. 

Originally the WIRES Australia donation started as something small I could do, that I thought would be nice to do as kind of a side feature of the exhibition I have running in Canberra right now. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that it might get the kind of reach it has bee, getting national press. It’s hard to describe just how gratifying it is that something I made is having such an effect on people, I haven’t experienced that before on this level.

Josh Dykgraaf

Originally the WIRES Australia donation started as something small I could do, that I thought would be nice to do as kind of a side feature of the exhibition I have running in Canberra right now. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that it might get the kind of reach it has bee, getting national press. It’s hard to describe just how gratifying it is that something I made is having such an effect on people, I haven’t experienced that before on this level.”

You can see Josh’s stunning work here.