The Condor and the Eagle….an important documentary film

“An Important Documentary Film” – Academy Award Nominee and Environmental Activist, MARK RUFFALO

An important documentary film

Academy Award Nominee and Environmental Activist, MARK RUFFALO

As we work to resume our lives after the spread of COVID-19, Indigenous activists across Australia, and North and South America continue to defend the earth’s land and waters, and to protect their communities from extraction and the pandemic.  EFFA (Environmental Film Festival Australia), always seek to support and learn from those at the front line of the struggle for climate justice. 

EFFA is proudly partnering with their friends at SEED MOB to present an online screening of the award-winning documentary The Condor and the Eagle. The film follows four Indigenous leaders embarking on a transcontinental adventure from the Canadian boreal forests to the heart of the Amazon jungle to document the Indigenous struggle to protect the land and water.

EFFA joins the film’s global network of impact campaigns led by organisations such as Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN), Amazon Watch, Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN), Indigenous Climate Action, Sierra Club and 350.org.

The film will be screened on Saturday 27 June at 11am, with a First Nations panel afterwards, with updates from the front lines of many Indigenous struggles. You will hear from the protagonists of the film, as well as land defenders from Australia. The online screening is through a sliding scale donation, and all donations are tax deductible. All funds donated from ticket sales will go towards the SEED MOB’s campaigns and EFFA’s first ever First Nations Initiative, as well as the film impact campaign and further Indigenous solidarity work. 

THE CONDOR AND THE EAGLE

At a point in humanity’s history, when so many of us feel isolated and helpless, The Condor & The Eagle brings connection in these times of crisis – reminding us of our deep interconnectedness with the Earth and one another. Never-before-seen images expose the global rise of land and water protectors across the Americas. Midst of the burning of the Amazon, the mega-fires in Australia, and the global climate strikes, this award-winning documentary documents the ongoing collective climate awakening and the imperative of urgent change. As world climate scientists predict unprecedented global catastrophe, “The Condor & The Eagle” features Indigenous women leaders deploying unparalleled global response. Facing this overwhelming current political climate, a great many people are looking for answers that are adapted to today’s urgency.

Four Indigenous leaders embark on an extraordinary trans-continental adventure from the Canadian Boreal forests to deep into the heart of the Amazonian jungle to unite the peoples of North and South America and deepen the meaning of “Climate Justice”. The Condor & The Eagle documentary offers a glimpse into a developing spiritual renaissance as the film four protagonists learn from each other’s long legacy of resistance to colonialism and its extractive economy. Their path through the jungle takes them on an unexpectedly challenging and liberating journey, which will forever change their attachment to the Earth and one another.

As we work to resume our lives after the spread of COVID-19, Indigenous activists across Australia, and North and South America continue to defend the earth’s land and waters, and to protect their communities from extraction and the pandemic.  EFFA (Environmental Film Festival Australia), always seek to support and learn from those at the front line of the struggle for climate justice. 

EFFA is proudly partnering with their friends at SEED MOB to present an online screening of the award-winning documentary The Condor and the Eagle. The film follows four Indigenous leaders embarking on a transcontinental adventure from the Canadian boreal forests to the heart of the Amazon jungle to document the Indigenous struggle to protect the land and water. 

EFFA joins the film’s global network of impact campaigns led by organisations such as Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN), Amazon Watch, Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature (GARN), Indigenous Climate Action, Sierra Club and 350.org.

The film will be screened on Saturday 27 June at 11am, with a First Nations panel afterwards, with updates from the front lines of many Indigenous struggles. You will hear from the protagonists of the film, as well as land defenders from Australia. The online screening is through a sliding scale donation, and all donations are tax deductible. All funds donated from ticket sales will go towards the SEED MOB’s campaigns and EFFA’s first ever First Nations Initiative, as well as the film impact campaign and further Indigenous solidarity work. 

THE CONDOR AND THE EAGLE

At a point in humanity’s history, when so many of us feel isolated and helpless, The Condor & The Eagle brings connection in these times of crisis – reminding us of our deep interconnectedness with the Earth and one another. Never-before-seen images expose the global rise of land and water protectors across the Americas. Midst of the burning of the Amazon, the mega-fires in Australia, and the global climate strikes, this award-winning documentary documents the ongoing collective climate awakening and the imperative of urgent change. As world climate scientists predict unprecedented global catastrophe, “The Condor & The Eagle” features Indigenous women leaders deploying unparalleled global response. Facing this overwhelming current political climate, a great many people are looking for answers that are adapted to today’s urgency.

Four Indigenous leaders embark on an extraordinary trans-continental adventure from the Canadian Boreal forests to deep into the heart of the Amazonian jungle to unite the peoples of North and South America and deepen the meaning of “Climate Justice”. The Condor & The Eagle documentary offers a glimpse into a developing spiritual renaissance as the film four protagonists learn from each other’s long legacy of resistance to colonialism and its extractive economy. Their path through the jungle takes them on an unexpectedly challenging and liberating journey, which will forever change their attachment to the Earth and one another.